A Treatise of Daunses, Wherin It is Shewed, That They Are as It Were Accessories and Dependants (Or Thynges Annexed) to Whoredome – Where Also by the Way is Touched and Proued, That Playes Are Ioyned and Knit Togeather in a Rancke or Rowe with Them (1581)

EText-No. 10108
Title: A Treatise of Daunses, Wherin It is Shewed, That They Are as It Were Accessories and Dependants (Or Thynges Annexed) to Whoredome – Where Also by the Way is Touched and Proued, That Playes Are Ioyned and Knit Togeather in a Rancke or Rowe with Them (1581)
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/10108/pg10108.epub

EText-No. 10108
Title: A Treatise of Daunses, Wherin It is Shewed, That They Are as It Were Accessories and Dependants (Or Thynges Annexed) to Whoredome – Where Also by the Way is Touched and Proued, That Playes Are Ioyned and Knit Togeather in a Rancke or Rowe with Them (1581)
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/10108/pg10108.html.utf8

EText-No. 10108
Title: A Treatise of Daunses, Wherin It is Shewed, That They Are as It Were Accessories and Dependants (Or Thynges Annexed) to Whoredome – Where Also by the Way is Touched and Proued, That Playes Are Ioyned and Knit Togeather in a Rancke or Rowe with Them (1581)
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/10108/pg10108.mobi

EText-No. 10108
Title: A Treatise of Daunses, Wherin It is Shewed, That They Are as It Were Accessories and Dependants (Or Thynges Annexed) to Whoredome – Where Also by the Way is Touched and Proued, That Playes Are Ioyned and Knit Togeather in a Rancke or Rowe with Them (1581)
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/0/1/0/10108/10108.txt
Link: cache/generated/10108/pg10108.txt.utf8

EText-No. 10108
Title: A Treatise of Daunses, Wherin It is Shewed, That They Are as It Were Accessories and Dependants (Or Thynges Annexed) to Whoredome – Where Also by the Way is Touched and Proued, That Playes Are Ioyned and Knit Togeather in a Rancke or Rowe with Them (1581)
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/0/1/0/10108/10108.zip

A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli

EText-No. 13870
Title: A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
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EText-No. 13870
Title: A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/3/8/7/13870/13870-h/13870-h.htm

EText-No. 13870
Title: A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/13870/pg13870-images.mobi
Link: cache/generated/13870/pg13870.mobi

EText-No. 13870
Title: A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/3/8/7/13870/13870.txt
Link: cache/generated/13870/pg13870.txt.utf8

EText-No. 13870
Title: A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/3/8/7/13870/13870-h.zip

EText-No. 13870
Title: A Summary History of the Palazzo Dandolo – Now Royal Hotel Danieli
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/3/8/7/13870/13870.zip

A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.

EText-No. 15019
Title: A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/15019/pg15019.epub

EText-No. 15019
Title: A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/5/0/1/15019/15019-h/15019-h.htm

EText-No. 15019
Title: A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/15019/pg15019.mobi

EText-No. 15019
Title: A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/5/0/1/15019/15019-8.txt
Link: 1/5/0/1/15019/15019.txt
Link: cache/generated/15019/pg15019.txt.utf8

EText-No. 15019
Title: A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/5/0/1/15019/15019-h.zip

EText-No. 15019
Title: A Queens Delight – The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying. As also, A right – Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent – Waters.
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
Link: 1/5/0/1/15019/15019-8.zip
Link: 1/5/0/1/15019/15019.zip

I sing of a maiden that matchless is – English Ayres

English Ayres - Archivio Magnatune

I sing of a maiden that matchless is, but what maiden? A rosy-cheeked milkmaid treading the dawn dew as she goes out to milk her cows? A fine lady sighing at the window of castle tower? Or Our Lady, Queen of Heaven, Mother of God and Star of the Sea? It has been said that in mediaeval poetry you often cannot tell whether the poet is talking about his mistress or the Virgin Mary, and indeed that is neatly borne out in the lyrics of tracks 3 and 4 here, which use exactly the same imagery of a knight swearing fealty to his liege-lord – ?I am thy man, hand and foot, day and night? – to express devotion to Mary, and to a lover, respectively.

Erotic love and spiritual love sat easily together in the mediaeval mind in a way that they have not done since. Conventional history would explain that the language of mediaeval courtly love suited devotional poetry because courtly love was love from afar, never to be attained or consummated, having its origins in the feelings of young squires for the castle chatelaine whose lord was away fighting the crusades, perhaps. Later, a wedge was driven between romance and religion, firstly by the Protestant reformation of the 16th century, which sharply demoted the female principle in Christianity, banishing the mystical, magical, sensual, ritual, decorative and emotional aspects of faith; and secondly by scientific rationalism.

Today of course, Darwinism and neurochemistry tell us, rather unsentimentally, that romantic love is associated with the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin, and is part of a strategy evolved to ensure strong pair-bonding between the parents of the vulnerable human infant, while religious experience may be related to the hormone dimethyltriptamine, and the stimulation of the right temporal lobe of the brain.Yet for all that, could it be that the mediaevals, rather than being merely foolish and unreflective, were simply rather more honest than we are, in acknowledging the overlap between different types of love and beauty, sacred and secular, which in our modern prudery we feel embarrassed about? Many a new mother must have been surprised to discover that the strongest and purest love of all, of a mother for her child, can feel like a romantic, even erotic attachment.

This album then, celebrates a melting away of customary boundaries, a glorious mediaeval mixture and muddle, if muddle it be, between the sacred and the profane, the worldly and the spiritual, as expressed in 700 years of English music. Here are religious songs which were really popular ballads, probably never sung in any church [tracks 1, 3, 20] or which present spirituality in terms either of romantic love [tracks 9, 11] or of loving human relationships [tracks 3, 5, 10]. Alongside these we have put songs which, conversely, present romantic love in spiritual terms, in the language of faithful vow and pilgrimage [tracks 4, 13, 14, 16, 17] or which stand in the courtly love tradition of devotion to an unattainably high object [tracks 4, 8, 19]. As so often in English music, the imagery of nature is a thread running through all, even in religious music, where we would not particularly expect it [tracks 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 13, 15, 18, 19]. So we have included three songs which simply celebrate nature and the English village scene; a mediaeval song in praise of ivy [6], a song describing a morris dancing contest [19], and a classic English folksong of young love in a rural setting [15]. As befits our theme, we have not kept to a strict historical order, and the mediaeval lyrics are (in the case of the Holst settings) rendered into modern English or (in the case of the original mediaeval settings) tweaked here and there so that the listener should catch as much as possible without too much recourse to the lyric sheet.
[hifi lofi] Play all tracks as an m3u audio stream (or xspf, ogg, mp3 file)
[hifi lofi] 01-Man may longe lives ween (anon 13th century) (3:00)
[hifi lofi] 02-I sing of a maiden that matchless is (Gustav Holst) (1:19)
[hifi lofi] 03-Edi be thu (anon 13th century) (3:34)
[hifi lofi] 04-Now would I fain summer this make (anon 15th century) (2:21)
[hifi lofi] 05-My soul has nought but fire and ice (Gustav Holst) (0:51)
[hifi lofi] 06-Ivy is good (anon 15th century) (2:40)
[hifi lofi] 07-Down by the salley gardens (trad) (1:39)
[hifi lofi] 08-Fowles in the frith bird on a briar (anon 13th century) (2:44)
[hifi lofi] 09-Jesu sweet now will I sing (Gustav Holst) (2:20)
[hifi lofi] 10-Stand well mother under rood (anon 13th to 14th century) (6:07)
[hifi lofi] 11-My leman is so true (Gustav Holst) (2:12)
[hifi lofi] 12-Ah Robin (William Cornish c1520) (1:46)
[hifi lofi] 13-How should I your true love know Walsingham (anon 16th century) (4:06)
[hifi lofi] 14-Wounded I am Yet of us twain (William Byrd 1589) (3:25)
[hifi lofi] 15-As I walked through the meadow (trad) (2:31)
[hifi lofi] 16-Madame damours (anon c1520) (3:16)
[hifi lofi] 17-Cavalilly man (anon 17th century) (5:03)
[hifi lofi] 18-Lo country sports (Thomas Weelkes 1597) (1:23)
[hifi lofi] 19-Silent worship (GF Handel A Somervell) (1:56)
[hifi lofi] 20-Dives and Lazarus (trad) (4:46)
[hifi lofi] 21-Deprecamur te domine (anon Anglo Saxon) (2:21)

 


I sing of a maiden that matchless is by English Ayres

Medieval and Traditional Carols, Chansons and Festive Dances – In Nova Cantica

Archivio Magnatune

[hifi lofi] Play all tracks as an m3u audio stream (or xspf, ogg, mp3 file)
[hifi lofi] 01-Psallite Unigenito (Traditional) (0:58)
[hifi lofi] 02-In Dulci Jubilo 1 (Michael Praetorius) (2:28)
[hifi lofi] 03-In Dulci Jubilo 2 (Michael Praetorius) (1:23)
[hifi lofi] 04-Maria Durch Ein Dornwald Ging (Traditional German) (1:54)
[hifi lofi] 05-Joseph Lieber Joseph Mein (Traditional German) (1:28)
[hifi lofi] 06-Greensleeves (Anonymous) (2:38)
[hifi lofi] 07-Ballet Dances from Taffelconsort 1621 (Thomas Simpson) (1:12)
[hifi lofi] 08-Almande Dances from Taffelconsort 1621 (Thomas Simpson) (1:53)
[hifi lofi] 09-Courant Dances from Taffelconsort 1621 (Johann Krosch) (0:46)
[hifi lofi] 10-Courant Dances from Taffelconsort 1621 (Christian Engelmann) (1:03)
[hifi lofi] 11-Aria Mistress Nichols Almand Dances from Taffelconsort 1621 (John Dowland) (1:27)
[hifi lofi] 12-Volta Dances from Taffelconsort 1621 (John Dowland) (1:12)
[hifi lofi] 13-Je Donne A Tous Les Amoureux (Guillaume Dufay) (3:25)
[hifi lofi] 14-Bon Jour Bon Mois (Guillaume Dufay) (1:42)
[hifi lofi] 15-Entre Vous Gentils Amoureux (Guillaume Dufay) (4:06)
[hifi lofi] 16-Stella Splendens (Traditional Spanish) (4:59)
[hifi lofi] 17-Nowell Dieu Vous Garde (Traditional English) (2:26)
[hifi lofi] 18-Hail Mary (Traditional English) (3:36)
[hifi lofi] 19-John Kiss Me Now (David Mell) (2:59)
[hifi lofi] 20-Wassail (Traditional English) (3:26)
[hifi lofi] 21-Tarleton’s Resurrection (John Dowland) (1:57)
[hifi lofi] 22-The Night Watch (Anthony Holborne) (1:16)
[hifi lofi] 23-Ermuntre Dich (Johann Philipp Krieger) (5:57)


Medieval and Traditional Carols, Chansons and Festive Dances by In Nova Cantica

 

Soneto a Cristo crucificado

No me mueve, mi Dios, para quererte
el cielo que me tienes prometido,
ni me mueve el infierno tan temido
para dejar por eso de ofenderte.

Tú me mueves, Señor, muéveme el verte
clavado en una cruz y escarnecido,
muéveme ver tu cuerpo tan herido,
muévenme tus afrentas y tu muerte.

Muéveme, en fin, tu amor, y en tal manera,
que aunque no hubiera cielo, yo te amara,
y aunque no hubiera infierno, te temiera.

No me tienes que dar porque te quiera,
pues aunque lo que espero no esperara,
lo mismo que te quiero te quisiera.

Romance de Doña Urraca

¡Rey don Sancho, rey don Sancho,   ya que te apuntan las barbas,
quien te las vido nacer   no te las verá logradas!

Don Fernando apenas muerto,    Sancho a Zamora cercaba,
de un cabo la cerca el rey,   del otro el Cid la apremiaba.
Del cabo que el rey la cerca   Zamora no se da nada;
del cabo que el Cid la aqueja   Zamora ya se tomaba;
corren las aguas del Duero   tintas en sangre cristiana.
Habló el viejo Arias Gonzalo,   el ayo de doña Urraca:
—Vámonos, hija, a los moros   dejad a Zamora salva,
pues vuestro hermano y el Cid   tan mal os desheredaban.

Doña Urraca en tanta cuita   se asomaba a la muralla,
y desde una torre mocha   el campo del Cid miraba.

La misa del amor (Mañanita de San Juan)

Mañanita de San Juan,   mañanita de primor,
cuando damas y galanes   van a oír misa mayor.
Allá va la mi señora,   entre todas la mejor;
viste saya sobre saya,   mantellín de tornasol,
camisa con oro y perlas   bordada en el cabezón.
En la su boca muy linda   lleva un poco de dulzor;
en la su cara tan blanca,   un poquito de arrebol,
y en los sus ojuelos garzos   lleva un poco de alcohol;
así entraba por la iglesia   relumbrando como el sol.
Las damas mueren de envidia,   y los galanes de amor.
El que cantaba en el coro,   en el credo se perdió;
el abad que dice misa,   ha trocado la lición;
monacillos que le ayudan,   no aciertan responder, non,
por decir amén, amén,   decían amor, amor.

Romance del Conde Arnaldos

¡Quién hubiera tal ventura   sobre las aguas del mar
como hubo el infante Arnaldos   la mañana de San Juan!
Andando a buscar la caza   para su falcón cebar,
vio venir una galera   que a tierra quiere llegar;
las velas trae de sedas,   la ejarcia de oro torzal,
áncoras tiene de plata,   tablas de fino coral.
Marinero que la guía,   diciendo viene un cantar,
que la mar ponía en calma,   los vientos hace amainar;
los peces que andan al hondo,   arriba los hace andar;
las aves que van volando,   al mástil vienen posar.
Allí habló el infante Arnaldos,   bien oiréis lo que dirá:
—Por tu vida, el marinero,   dígasme ora ese cantar.
Respondióle el marinero,   tal respuesta le fue a dar:
—Yo no canto mi canción   sino a quién conmigo va.

Tres morillas me enmoran en Jaén

Tres morillas me enamoran
en Jaén,
Axa y Fátima y Marién.

Tres morillas tan garridas
iban a coger olivas,
y hallábanlas cogidas
en Jaén,
Axa y Fátima y Marién.

Y hallábanlas cogidas,
y tornaban desmaídas
y las colores perdidas
en Jaén,
Axa y Fátima y Marién.

Tres moricas tan lozanas,
tres moricas tan lozanas,
iban a coger manzanas
a Jaén:
Axa y Fátima y Marién.