Archivi tag: Twain

Mark Twain – Chapters from my Autobiography – Audiobook

EText-No. 19682
Title: Chapters from My Autobiography
Author: Twain, Mark;Twain, Mark (Samuel Clemens);Clemens, Samuel Langhorne;1910;1835
Language: English
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EText-No. 19682
Title: Chapters from My Autobiography
Author: Twain, Mark;Twain, Mark (Samuel Clemens);Clemens, Samuel Langhorne;1910;1835
Language: English
Link: 1/9/6/8/19682/19682-mp3.zip

 

Mark Twain – The Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Audiobook MP3

 

EText-No. 74
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/74/74-h/74-h.htm

EText-No. 74
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/74/pg74-images.mobi
Link: cache/generated/74/pg74.mobi

EText-No. 74
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/74/74.txt
Link: cache/generated/74/pg74.txt.utf8

EText-No. 74
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/74/74-h.zip

EText-No. 74
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/74/74.zip

EText-No. 26203
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 2/6/2/0/26203/26203-index.html

EText-No. 26203
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 26203
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 2/6/2/0/26203/26203-readme.txt

EText-No. 7193
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 1.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7193/pg7193.epub
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EText-No. 7193
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 1.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7193/7193-h/7193-h.htm

EText-No. 7193
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 1.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7193
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 1.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7193/7193.txt
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EText-No. 7193
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 1.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7193/7193-h.zip

EText-No. 7193
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 1.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7193/7193.zip

EText-No. 7194
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 2.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7194/pg7194.epub
Link: cache/generated/7194/pg7194-images.epub

EText-No. 7194
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 2.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7194/7194-h/7194-h.htm

EText-No. 7194
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 2.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7194
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 2.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7194/7194.txt
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EText-No. 7194
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 2.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7194/7194-h.zip

EText-No. 7194
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 2.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7194/7194.zip

EText-No. 7195
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 3.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7195/pg7195.epub
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EText-No. 7195
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 3.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7195/7195-h/7195-h.htm

EText-No. 7195
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 3.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7195
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 3.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7195/7195.txt
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EText-No. 7195
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 3.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7195/7195-h.zip

EText-No. 7195
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 3.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7195/7195.zip

EText-No. 7196
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 4.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7196/pg7196.epub
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EText-No. 7196
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 4.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7196/7196-h/7196-h.htm

EText-No. 7196
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 4.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7196
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 4.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7196/7196.txt
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EText-No. 7196
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 4.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7196/7196-h.zip

EText-No. 7196
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 4.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7196/7196.zip

EText-No. 7197
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 5.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7197/pg7197.epub
Link: cache/generated/7197/pg7197-images.epub

EText-No. 7197
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 5.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7197/7197-h/7197-h.htm

EText-No. 7197
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 5.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7197/pg7197-images.mobi
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EText-No. 7197
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 5.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7197/7197.txt
Link: cache/generated/7197/pg7197.txt.utf8

EText-No. 7197
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 5.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7197/7197-h.zip

EText-No. 7197
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 5.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7197/7197.zip

EText-No. 7198
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 6.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7198/pg7198.epub
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EText-No. 7198
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 6.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7198/7198-h/7198-h.htm

EText-No. 7198
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 6.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7198
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 6.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7198
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 6.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7198/7198-h.zip

EText-No. 7198
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 6.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7198/7198.zip

EText-No. 7199
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 7.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7199/pg7199.epub
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EText-No. 7199
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 7.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7199/7199-h/7199-h.htm

EText-No. 7199
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 7.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7199
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 7.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7199/7199.txt
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EText-No. 7199
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 7.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7199/7199-h.zip

EText-No. 7199
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 7.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/1/9/7199/7199.zip

EText-No. 7200
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 8.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: cache/generated/7200/pg7200.epub
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EText-No. 7200
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 8.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/2/0/7200/7200-h/7200-h.htm

EText-No. 7200
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 8.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
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EText-No. 7200
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 8.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/2/0/7200/7200.txt
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EText-No. 7200
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 8.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/2/0/7200/7200-h.zip

EText-No. 7200
Title: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Part 8.
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Language: English
Link: 7/2/0/7200/7200.zip

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Mark Twain – Complete Letters

MY DEAR SISTER,—I have not written to any of the family for some time, from the fact, firstly, that I didn’t know where they were, and secondly, because I have been fooling myself with the idea that I was going to leave New York every day for the last two weeks. I have taken a liking to the abominable place, and every time I get ready to leave, I put it off a day or so, from some unaccountable cause. It is as hard on my conscience to leave New York, as it was easy to leave Hannibal. I think I shall get off Tuesday, though.

Edwin Forrest has been playing, for the last sixteen days, at the Broadway Theatre, but I never went to see him till last night. The play was the “Gladiator.” I did not like parts of it much, but other portions were really splendid. In the latter part of the last act, where the “Gladiator” (Forrest) dies at his brother’s feet, (in all the fierce pleasure of gratified revenge,) the man’s whole soul seems absorbed in the part he is playing; and it is really startling to see him. I am sorry I did not see him play “Damon and Pythias” the former character being his greatest. He appears in Philadelphia on Monday night.

I have not received a letter from home lately, but got a “‘Journal'” the other day, in which I see the office has been sold. I suppose Ma, Orion and Henry are in St. Louis now. If Orion has no other project in his head, he ought to take the contract for getting out some weekly paper, if he cannot get a foremanship. Now, for such a paper as the “Presbyterian” (containing about 60,000,—[Sixty thousand ems, type measurement.]) he could get $20 or $25 per week, and he and Henry could easily do the work; nothing to do but set the type and make up the forms….

If my letters do not come often, you need not bother yourself about me; for if you have a brother nearly eighteen years of age, who is not able to take care of himself a few miles from home, such a brother is not worth one’s thoughts: and if I don’t manage to take care of No. 1, be assured you will never know it. I am not afraid, however; I shall ask favors from no one, and endeavor to be (and shall be) as “independent as a wood-sawyer’s clerk.”

I never saw such a place for military companies as New York. Go on the street when you will, you are sure to meet a company in full uniform, with all the usual appendages of drums, fifes, &c. I saw a large company of soldiers of 1812 the other day, with a ’76 veteran scattered here and there in the ranks. And as I passed through one of the parks lately, I came upon a company of boys on parade. Their uniforms were neat, and their muskets about half the common size. Some of them were not more than seven or eight years of age; but had evidently been well-drilled.

Passage to Albany (160 miles) on the finest steamers that ply’ the Hudson, is now 25 cents—cheap enough, but is generally cheaper than that in the summer.

I want you to write as soon as I tell you where to direct your letter. I would let you know now, if I knew myself. I may perhaps be here a week longer; but I cannot tell. When you write tell me the whereabouts of the family. My love to Mr. Moffett and Ella. Tell Ella I intend to write to her soon, whether she wants me to nor not.

                              Truly your Brother,

                                        SAML L. CLEMENS.


VOLUME I.

FOREWORD

MARK TWAIN—A BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY

MARK TWAIN’S LETTERS

I.
EARLY LETTERS, 1853. NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA

II.
LETTERS 1856-61. KEOKUK, AND THE RIVER. END OF PILOTING

III.
LETTERS 1861-62. ON THE FRONTIER. MINING ADVENTURES. JOURNALISTIC BEGINNINGS.

IV.
LETTERS 1863-64. “MARK TWAIN.” COMSTOCK JOURNALISM. ARTEMUS WARD

V.
LETTERS 1864-66. SAN FRANCISCO AND HAWAII

VI.
LETTERS 1866-67. THE LECTURER. SUCCESS ON THE COAST. IN NEW YORK. THE GREAT OCEAN EXCURSION.


 VOLUME II.

VII.
LETTERS 1867. THE TRAVELER. THE VOYAGE OF THE “QUAKER CITY”

VIII.
LETTERS 1867-68. WASHINGTON AND SAN FRANCISCO. THE PROPOSED BOOK OF TRAVEL. A NEW LECTURE.

IX.
LETTERS 1868-70. COURTSHIP, AND “THE INNOCENTS ABROAD”

X.
LETTERS 1870-71. MARK TWAIN IN BUFFALO. MARRIAGE. THE BUFFALO EXPRESS. “MEMORANDA.” LECTURES. A NEW BOOK.

XI.
LETTERS 1871-72. REMOVAL TO HARTFORD. A LECTURE TOUR. “ROUGHING IT.” FIRST LETTER TO HOWELLS.

XII.
LETTERS 1872-73. MARK TWAIN IN ENGLAND. LONDON HONORS. ACQUAINTANCE WITH DR. JOHN BROWN. A LECTURE TRIUMPH. “THE GILDED AGE”.

XIII.
LETTERS 1874. HARTFORD AND ELMIRA. A NEW STUDY. BEGINNING “TOM SAWYER.” THE SELLERS PLAY.

XIV.
LETTERS 1874. MISSISSIPPI CHAPTERS. VISITS TO BOSTON. A JOKE ON ALDRICH.

XV.
LETTERS FROM HARTFORD, 1875. MUCH CORRESPONDENCE WITH HOWELLS


 VOLUME III.

XVI.
LETTERS, 1876, CHIEFLY TO W. D. HOWELLS. LITERATURE AND POLITICS. PLANNING A PLAY WITH BRET HARTE.

XVII.
LETTERS, 1877. TO BERMUDA WITH TWICHELL. PROPOSITION TO TH. NAST. THE WHITTIER DINNER.

XVIII.
LETTERS FROM EUROPE, 1878-79. TRAMPING WITH TWICHELL. WRITING A NEW TRAVEL BOOK. LIFE IN MUNICH.

XIX.
LETTERS 1879. RETURN TO AMERICA. THE GREAT GRANT REUNION

XX.
LETTERS OF 1880, CHIEFLY TO HOWELLS. “THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER.” MARK TWAIN MUGWUMP SOCIETY.

XXI.
LETTERS 1881, TO HOWELLS AND OTHERS. ASSISTING A YOUNG SCULPTOR. LITERARY PLANS.

XXII.
LETTERS, 1882, MAINLY TO HOWELLS. WASTED FURY. OLD SCENES REVISITED. THE MISSISSIPPI BOOK.

XXIII.
LETTERS, 1883, TO HOWELLS AND OTHERS. A GUEST OF THE MARQUIS OF LORNE. THE HISTORY GAME. A PLAY BY HOWELLS AND MARK TWAIN.

XXIV.
LETTERS, 1884, TO HOWELLS AND OTHERS. CABLE’S GREAT APRIL FOOL. “HUCK FINN” IN PRESS. MARK TWAIN FOR CLEVELAND. CLEMENS AND CABLE.

XXV.
THE GREAT YEAR OF 1885. CLEMENS AND CABLE. PUBLICATION OF “HUCK


 VOLUME IV.

XXVI.
LETTERS, 1886-87. JANE CLEMENS’S ROMANCE. UNMAILED LETTERS, ETC.

XXVII.
MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS OF 1887. LITERARY ARTICLES. PEACEFUL DAYS AT THE FARM. FAVORITE READING. APOLOGY TO MRS. CLEVELAND, ETC.

XXVIII.
LETTERS,1888. A YALE DEGREE. WORK ON “THE YANKEE.” ON INTERVIEWING, ETC.

XXIX.
LETTERS, 1889. THE MACHINE. DEATH OF MR. CRANE. CONCLUSION OF THE YANKEE.

XXX.
LETTERS, 1890, CHIEFLY TO JOS. T. GOODMAN. THE GREAT MACHINE ENTERPRISE

XXXI.
LETTERS, 1891, TO HOWELLS, MRS. CLEMENS AND OTHERS. RETURN TO LITERATURE. AMERICAN CLAIMANT. LEAVING HARTFORD. EUROPE. DOWN THE RHINE.

XXXII.
LETTERS, 1892, CHIEFLY TO MR. HALL AND MRS. CRANE. IN BERLIN, MENTONE, BAD-NAUHEIM, FLORENCE.

XXXIII.
LETTERS, 1893, TO MR. HALL, MRS. CLEMENS, AND OTHERS. FLORENCE. BUSINESS TROUBLES. “PUDD’NHEAD WILSON.” “JOAN OF ARC.” AT THE PLAYERS, NEW

XXXIV.
LETTERS 1894. A WINTER IN NEW YORK. BUSINESS FAILURE. END OF THE MACHINE.

XXXV.
LETTERS, 1895-96, TO H. H. ROGERS AND OTHERS. FINISHING “JOAN OF ARC.” THE TRIP AROUND THE WORLD. DEATH OF SUSY CLEMENS.

XXXVI.
LETTERS 1897. LONDON, SWITZERLAND, VIENNA

XXXVII.
LETTERS, 1898, TO HOWELLS AND TWICHELL. LIFE IN VIENNA. PAYMENT OF THE DEBTS. ASSASSINATION OF THE EMPRESS.

XXXVIII.
LETTERS, 1899, TO HOWELLS AND OTHERS. VIENNA. LONDON. A SUMMER IN SWEDEN.

XXXIX.
LETTERS OF 1900, MAINLY TO TWICHELL. THE BOER WAR. BOXER TROUBLES. THE RETURN TO AMERICA.


 VOLUME V.

XL.
LETTERS OF 1901, CHIEFLY TO TWICHELL. MARK TWAIN AS A REFORMER. SUMMER AT SARANAC. ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT McKINLEY.

XLI.
LETTERS OF 1902. RIVERDALE. YORK HARBOR. ILLNESS OF MRS. CLEMENS

XLII.
LETTERS OF 1903. TO VARIOUS PERSONS. HARD DAYS AT RIVERDALE. LAST SUMMER AT ELMIRA. THE RETURN TO ITALY.

XLIII.
LETTERS OF 1904. TO VARIOUS PERSONS. LIFE IN VILLA QUARTO. DEATH OF MRS. CLEMENS. THE RETURN TO AMERICA.

XLIV.
LETTERS OF 1905. TO TWICHELL, MR. DUNEKA AND OTHERS. POLITICS AND HUMANITY. A SUMMER AT DUBLIN. MARK TWAIN AT 70.

XLV.
LETTERS, 1906, TO VARIOUS PERSONS. THE FAREWELL LECTURE. A SECOND SUMMER IN DUBLIN. BILLIARDS AND COPYRIGHT.


 VOLUME VI.

XLVI.
LETTERS 1907-08. A DEGREE FROM OXFORD. THE NEW HOME AT REDDING.

XLVII.
LETTERS, 1909. TO HOWELLS AND OTHERS. LIFE AT STORMFIELD. COPYRIGHT EXTENSION. DEATH OF JEAN CLEMENS

XLVIII.
LETTERS OF 1910. LAST TRIP TO BERMUDA. LETTERS TO PAINE. THE LAST LETTER.

Mark Twain – Christian Science

This last summer, when I was on my way back to Vienna from the Appetite-Cure in the mountains, I fell over a cliff in the twilight, and broke some arms and legs and one thing or another, and by good luck was found by some peasants who had lost an ass, and they carried me to the nearest habitation, which was one of those large, low, thatch-roofed farm-houses, with apartments in the garret for the family, and a cunning little porch under the deep gable decorated with boxes of bright colored flowers and cats; on the ground floor a large and light sitting-room, separated from the milch-cattle apartment by a partition; and in the front yard rose stately and fine the wealth and pride of the house, the manure-pile. That sentence is Germanic, and shows that I am acquiring that sort of mastery of the art and spirit of the language which enables a man to travel all day in one sentence without changing cars.

There was a village a mile away, and a horse doctor lived there, but there was no surgeon. It seemed a bad outlook; mine was distinctly a surgery case. Then it was remembered that a lady from Boston was summering in that village, and she was a Christian Science doctor and could cure anything. So she was sent for. It was night by this time, and she could not conveniently come, but sent word that it was no matter, there was no hurry, she would give me “absent treatment” now, and come in the morning; meantime she begged me to make myself tranquil and comfortable and remember that there was nothing the matter with me. I thought there must be some mistake.

“Did you tell her I walked off a cliff seventy-five feet high?”

“Yes.”

“And struck a boulder at the bottom and bounced?”

“Yes.”

EText-No. 3187
Title: Christian Science
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 3/1/8/3187/3187-h/3187-h.htm

Mark Twain – Chapters of my Autobiography

I have not examined into these traditions myself, partly because I was indolent, and partly because I was so busy polishing up this end of the line and trying to make it showy; but the other Clemenses claim that they have made the examination and that it stood the test. Therefore I have always taken for granted that I did help Charles out of his troubles, by ancestral proxy. My instincts have persuaded me, too. Whenever we have a strong and persistent and ineradicable instinct, we may be sure that it is not original with us, but inherited—inherited from away back, and hardened and perfected by the petrifying influence of time. Now I have been always and unchangingly bitter against Charles, and I am quite certain that this feeling trickled down to me through the veins of my forebears from the heart of that judge; for it is not my disposition to be bitter against people on my own personal account I am not bitter against Jeffreys. I ought to be, but I am not. It indicates that my ancestors of James II’s time were indifferent to him; I do not know why; I never could make it out; but that is what it indicates. And I have always felt friendly toward Satan. Of course that is ancestral; it must be in the blood, for I could not have originated it.

… And so, by the testimony of instinct, backed by the assertions of Clemenses who said they had examined the records, I have always been obliged to believe that Geoffrey Clement the martyr-maker was an ancestor of mine, and to regard him with favor, and in fact pride. This has not had a good effect upon me, for it has made me vain, and that is a fault. It has made me set myself above people who were less fortunate in their ancestry than I, and has moved me to take them down a peg, upon occasion, and say things to them which hurt them before company.

EText-No. 19987
Title: Chapters from My Autobiography
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 1/9/9/8/19987/19987-h/19987-h.htm

Mark Twain – Alonzo Fitz and other stories

It was well along in the forenoon of a bitter winter’s day. The town of Eastport, in the state of Maine, lay buried under a deep snow that was newly fallen. The customary bustle in the streets was wanting. One could look long distances down them and see nothing but a dead-white emptiness, with silence to match. Of course I do not mean that you could see the silence—no, you could only hear it. The sidewalks were merely long, deep ditches, with steep snow walls on either side. Here and there you might hear the faint, far scrape of a wooden shovel, and if you were quick enough you might catch a glimpse of a distant black figure stooping and disappearing in one of those ditches, and reappearing the next moment with a motion which you would know meant the heaving out of a shovelful of snow. But you needed to be quick, for that black figure would not linger, but would soon drop that shovel and scud for the house, thrashing itself with its arms to warm them. Yes, it was too venomously cold for snow-shovelers or anybody else to stay out long.

Presently the sky darkened; then the wind rose and began to blow in fitful, vigorous gusts, which sent clouds of powdery snow aloft, and straight ahead, and everywhere. Under the impulse of one of these gusts, great white drifts banked themselves like graves across the streets; a moment later another gust shifted them around the other way, driving a fine spray of snow from their sharp crests, as the gale drives the spume flakes from wave-crests at sea; a third gust swept that place as clean as your hand, if it saw fit. This was fooling, this was play; but each and all of the gusts dumped some snow into the sidewalk ditches, for that was business.

EText-No. 3184
Title: Alonzo Fitz and Other Stories
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 3/1/8/3184/3184-h/3184-h.htm

Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckelberry Finn

YOU don’t know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain’t no matter.  That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly.  There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth.  That is nothing.  I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary.  Aunt Polly—Tom’s Aunt Polly, she is—and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up is this:  Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich.  We got six thousand dollars apiece—all gold.  It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up.  Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round—more than a body could tell what to do with.  The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn’t stand it no longer I lit out.  I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied.  But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable.  So I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn’t do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up.  Well, then, the old thing commenced again.  The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn’t go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn’t really anything the matter with them,—that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself.  In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn’t care no more about him, because I don’t take no stock in dead people.

EText-No. 19640
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 1/9/6/4/19640/19640-index.html

EText-No. 7100
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 01 to 05
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7100/7100-h/7100-h.htm

EText-No. 7101
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 06 to 10
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7101/7101-h/7101-h.htm

EText-No. 7102
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 11 to 15
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7102/7102-h/7102-h.htm

EText-No. 7103
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 16 to 20
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7103/7103-h/7103-h.htm

EText-No. 7104
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 21 to 25
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7104/7104-h/7104-h.htm

EText-No. 7105
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 26 to 30
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7105/7105-h/7105-h.htm

EText-No. 7106
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 31 to 35
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7106/7106-h/7106-h.htm

EText-No. 7107
Title: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapters 36 to The Last
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 7/1/0/7107/7107-h/7107-h.htm

Mark Twain – A Tramp Abroad

Everybody was out-of-doors; everybody was in the principal street of the village—not on the sidewalks, but all over the street; everybody was lounging, loafing, chatting, waiting, alert, expectant, interested—for it was train-time. That is to say, it was diligence-time—the half-dozen big diligences would soon be arriving from Geneva, and the village was interested, in many ways, in knowing how many people were coming and what sort of folk they might be. It was altogether the livest-looking street we had seen in any village on the continent.

The hotel was by the side of a booming torrent, whose music was loud and strong; we could not see this torrent, for it was dark, now, but one could locate it without a light. There was a large enclosed yard in front of the hotel, and this was filled with groups of villagers waiting to see the diligences arrive, or to hire themselves to excursionists for the morrow. A telescope stood in the yard, with its huge barrel canted up toward the lustrous evening star. The long porch of the hotel was populous with tourists, who sat in shawls and wraps under the vast overshadowing bulk of Mont Blanc, and gossiped or meditated.

EText-No. 5782
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 01
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5782/5782-h/5782-h.htm

EText-No. 5783
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 02
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5783/5783-h/5783-h.htm

EText-No. 5784
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 03
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5784/5784-h/5784-h.htm

EText-No. 5785
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 04
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5785/5785-h/5785-h.htm

EText-No. 5786
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 05
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5786/5786-h/5786-h.htm

EText-No. 5787
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 06
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5787/5787-h/5787-h.htm

EText-No. 5788
Title: A Tramp Abroad — Volume 07
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: 5/7/8/5788/5788-h/5788-h.htm

Mark Twain – A Horse’s Tale

I am Buffalo Bill’s horse.  I have spent my life under his saddle—with him in it, too, and he is good for two hundred pounds, without his clothes; and there is no telling how much he does weigh when he is out on the war-path and has his batteries belted on.  He is over six feet, is young, hasn’t an ounce of waste flesh, is straight, graceful, springy in his motions, quick as a cat, and has a handsome face, and black hair dangling down on his shoulders, and is beautiful to look at; and nobody is braver than he is, and nobody is stronger, except myself.  Yes, a person that doubts that he is fine to see should see him in his beaded buck-skins, on my back and his rifle peeping above his shoulder, chasing a hostile trail, with me going like the wind and his hair streaming out behind from the shelter of his broad slouch.  Yes, he is a sight to look at then—and I’m part of it myself.

I am his favorite horse, out of dozens.  Big as he is, I have carried him eighty-one miles between nightfall and sunrise on the scout; and I am good for fifty, day in and day out, and all the time.  I am not large, but I am built on a business basis.  I have carried him thousands and thousands of miles on scout duty for the army, and there’s not a gorge, nor a pass, nor a valley, nor a fort, nor a trading post, nor a buffalo-range in the whole sweep of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains that we don’t know as well as we know the bugle-calls.  He is Chief of Scouts to the Army of the Frontier, and it makes us very important.  In such a position as I hold in the military service one needs to be of good family and possess an education much above the common to be worthy of the place.  I am the best-educated horse outside of the hippodrome, everybody says, and the best-mannered.  It may be so, it is not for me to say; modesty is the best policy, I think.  Buffalo Bill taught me the most of what I know, my mother taught me much, and I taught myself the rest.  Lay a row of moccasins before me—Pawnee, Sioux, Shoshone, Cheyenne, Blackfoot, and as many other tribes as you please—and I can name the tribe every moccasin belongs to by the make of it.  Name it in horse-talk, and could do it in American if I had speech.

EText-No. 1086
Title: A Horse’s Tale
Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1911
Language: English
Link: etext97/hrstl10h.htm